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Total solar eclipse 2021: What time and how to see on Saturday

(NEXSTAR) — A total solar eclipse changes from day to night in Antarctica on Saturday for nearly two minutes.

The solar eclipse that occurs when the moon passes directly between the sun and the earth Extinguish the sunlight 1 minute 54 seconds. A total solar eclipse is a short period in which the solar eclipse and the moon are completely obscured.

According to NASA, you’ll need to be on the southernmost continent of the world to get a full live experience, but in some other places you’ll see a partial solar eclipse on December 4.

However, instead of immersing yourself in the dark, viewers at the following locations can only see dark shadows appearing on the surface of the sun: St. Helena, Namibia, Lesotho, South Africa, South Georgia and the Sandwich Islands, Closet Islands, Falkland Islands, Chile, New Zealand, Australia.

In the Antarctic continent, the scenery is impressive and you may be able to see the sun’s corona, the atmosphere around the sun, which is usually too bright to observe.

The last total solar eclipse in Antarctica occurred in November 2003.

During the most visible total solar eclipse from Indonesia, Australia and Papua New Guinea on April 20, 2023, the world will see the total solar eclipse again.

Traveling to the Antarctic isn’t easy, but for those who want to witness a total solar eclipse in 2021, NASA has another option to stream the event live.

If the weather is nice, the stream will be streamed live from the Union Glacier in Antarctica at 1:30 EST, and the whole will start at 2:44 EST.

Total solar eclipse 2021: What time and how to see on Saturday

Source link Total solar eclipse 2021: What time and how to see on Saturday

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