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The exhibition at the National Museum of Mexico Diadem Ertos is in memory of the victims of COVID-19, a sad family.

Chicago (WLS)-COVID-19 victims will be remembered this year as part of the Day of the Dead exhibition at the National Museum of Mexico, which will be open to the public this weekend.

The special ofrenda and the first room the visitor sees will feature photos of 200 COVID victims. Their loved ones have submitted photos online to the museum over the past few weeks.

“I think Day of the Dead is a great way to deal with a pandemic and the losses incurred in the last two years,” said Cesareo Moreno, chief curator of the National Museum of Mexico.

“Mourning tells people’s stories,” Moreno said. “Keep them alive, stay part of the family, and let go little by little each time you say your name.”

Día de Muertos-Timeto Grieve & Remember will be held from Friday, September 10, 2021 to Sunday, December 12, 2021.

Moreno and his staff were finishing the exhibition this week. When complete, you’ll see photos of people who died on COVID.

“It’s tough, it’s tough,” Moreno said. “Looking at those 200 faces, over 200 faces were really as intense as in other years.”

The exhibit will also feature Adam Toledo, shot by a Chicago police officer. Vanessa Giren, a murdered Fort Hood soldier. And Ofelia Lara-a Chicagoer who died of nature.

Lara’s family couldn’t mourn together, so her daughter Maria Herrera made a quilt with Carina Yepes. Their work is part of the exhibition, and Yepeez said he wants to comfort everyone who sees it.

“I want them to feel a big hug, a big hug that our ancestors are with us,” Yepes said. “The legacy we have inherited continues through the stories we share.”

On October 30, the museum will host a public festival, Dia de los Muertos Chicago. At the Harrison Park event behind the museum, the general public can sign up online and create an off-render.

Jorge Valdívia will build an off-render in memory of his younger brother Mauricio, who died in COVID-19. People should follow public health protocols because he wants people to understand that the virus is genuine.

“It’s a reality and I don’t want to waste my brother’s death,” Baldivia said.

He also wants his altar to reflect the character of his brother. Mauricio Baldivia is married, has two sons, and is the oldest teenager.

“My brother was the life of the party,” said Jorge Valdívia. “He lived every moment as if it was his last. He instilled this sense of joy in each of us.”

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The exhibition at the National Museum of Mexico Diadem Ertos is in memory of the victims of COVID-19, a sad family.

Source link The exhibition at the National Museum of Mexico Diadem Ertos is in memory of the victims of COVID-19, a sad family.

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