Illinois

Small wrists on the cuffs: how police use force against children | Illinois News

The Chicago boy Royal was handcuffed at home with his mother and other adults for nearly 30 minutes in the cold. Then a police sergeant released him and his aunt began to take care of the children.

Royal’s brother Roy, one year older, was watching, not knowing what to say or what to do. Police did not handcuff him because “the officer ran out of handcuffs,” according to a lawsuit filed by his family. Roy thought his brother was the first to be cuffed because he looked “intimidating”: he wore a blue hoodie.

That spring, in another pocket on the South Side, there were three children of Crystal Archie. Police kicked open the front door twice, only twice every 11 weeks, tore the cabinet and dresser to search for the suspected drug. She had never heard of the people they were hunting for.

Her oldest child, Savannah, was 14, Terrier was 11, and her youngest, Gymarion, was 7. They were ordered to go down to the floor. Terrier said the scariest moment was watching the officer push his foot into the savanna’s back.

Archie said her children were “told and required to land on the ground as if they were criminals.”

“They were asked as if they were adults,” she said.

The savanna’s hands tremble when he sees a police car coming. “I’m stuck. I’m scared,” she said.

Small wrists on the cuffs: how police use force against children | Illinois News

Source link Small wrists on the cuffs: how police use force against children | Illinois News

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