Lifestyle

For South Sudanese mothers, COVID-19 has shaken a fragile foundation | Lifestyle

Beda told her that she would not allow her children to be part of the lost generation of uneducated and poverty-stricken South Sudan. She found a job outside the family complex and commute to the office in the capital, Juba, for an hour each way. This is a rare move for women in this mostly conservative part of the country. As a cleaner, she earns £ 16,000 a month, or about $ 35. She earns additional money by making cupcakes for sale in her office building.

But I don’t buy much money. After school reopened, inflation, combined with her husband’s salary, hollowed out Beda’s income. Before the pandemic, Beda said £ 100 “could get you something”, but now even 1,000 or 1,500 “do nothing”. The cost of the staple food, white sorghum, has risen from £ 1,000 in South Sudanese pounds to £ 1,500 in 3.5 kilograms in just six months.

Beda tries not to stick to the situation of her family before COVID-19. But she remembers. “Before Corona, life was good.”

Then Juba was a kind of shelter. Thanks to her husband’s salary and humanitarian food aid to supplement it, Beda was able to stay home and raise three children before the twins arrived. South Sudan received $ 1.1 billion in funding in 2019.

On their premises near the military base, Beda’s family (including father-in-law and mother-in-law) ate three meals a day. In countries where many women carry containers long distances from wells and rivers, drinking water has been delivered to relatively luxurious homes.

For South Sudanese mothers, COVID-19 has shaken a fragile foundation | Lifestyle

Source link For South Sudanese mothers, COVID-19 has shaken a fragile foundation | Lifestyle

Related Articles

Back to top button