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Associate Dean promotes physical and digital proximity to others

Dean Amy Jensen, an associate of the Faculty of Art and Communication, promoted physical and digital proximity as a way to build empathic relationships with others in a speech at the forum on July 27. (Ryan Campbell / BYU Photo)

In his speech at the Forum on July 27, Associate Dean Amy Jensen of the Faculty of Fine Arts and Communication promoted physical and digital proximity as a way to build empathic relationships with others.

Jensen shared how being a mother, manager, and art lover can help you feel familiar with the people you meet online.

“We need to learn to create proximity and immediacy, not distance or division, in both our physical and digital worlds,” says Jensen.

Regardless of the love and enjoyment of her digital media and platforms, she said she knows that the body and soul are the best tools humanity has.

“The next important thing is where we put our bodies and who we have emotional relationships with. When we say phrases like” stand in a holy place “or” love our neighbors, “I am from the tradition of faith. We are aware of these ideas. This is a word that evokes proximity and presence, “she said.

Jensen’s speech demonstrated her belief that people should see each other’s relationships as critical and intertwined. She said everyone wants to actively consider where their bodies are placed, where their souls are sent, and who they connect with. (BYU photo)

Jensen’s speech focused on how individuals can expand their sense of belonging by physically and digitally placing themselves where art is seen.

She said her goal in digital settings is to access knowledge, stimulate curiosity and see the beauty of the world. However, Jensen also recognized that Instagram, YouTube, TikTok, and many other social media platforms could become imbalanced and hurt.

She encouraged people to look specifically at the media as a means to create and embrace charities because of the double-edged nature of digital online settings. One can connect online and empathize with the incredibly diverse perspectives of all of God’s children as a whole.

Jensen quoted film theorist Sharon Swenson. “Charitatively created or viewed media artifacts give us the opportunity to experience other people, see why they make their choices, and experience the results of those choices together.”

Jensen’s antidote to the disappointing moments on social media was to treat her digital interaction as a mutual experience with others. “By deliberately creating or displaying art with the perspective of others in mind, we can welcome and evaluate the perspectives of others while reaching informed choices that match our values. increase.”

The speech demonstrated Jensen’s belief that people should see each other’s relationships as critical and intertwined. She said everyone wants to actively consider where their bodies are placed, where their souls are sent, and who they connect with.

“The education of art has taught us that we need to practice carefully so that everyone considers that they share the same test. Joy is conveyed with simple gestures and pain is pure empathy. Understanding comforts me, “she said.

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Associate Dean promotes physical and digital proximity to others

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